"A striking feature of all these sites is that they represent a social process of reading. Fans go online to talk with other readers who are engaging with the same books and television shows. As they do so, sharing their reading experiences allows them to grow closer, forming friendships with others through their common reading practices. Here, readers may also debate different ways of interpreting shared texts and, in so doing, they often spell out their assumptions about the nature of reading. Fans engage in close readings, citing specific passages, debating interpretations, and constructing arguments to support their analysis. Fans often say that such conversations open a favorite series to new interpretations, allowing them to see things they might have missed and providing them new motives to watch the episodes again… . These fan discussion forums illustrate one of the core new media literacy skills—collective intelligence. These community readers operate in a world where nobody knows everything, everybody knows something, and what is known by any member is available to the group as a whole on demand."
— Henry Jenkins, on what readers do online. (via sothinky)
Downton Abbey S5E5 - Comings and Goings

withanaccent:

Downton Abbey S5E5 – Comings and Goings

It’s difficult to recap an episode in which so many people do so little. Overall the season has been superior to series four, but some of the stories, while more substantive, are becoming mere hanging threads waiting to be tied up at the end.  The plots seem to have beginnings and will likely have ends, but their middles are muddled in many cases.  Tellingly, the gold of this episode belongs to…

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gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

joshwatchintv:

thatseanguyblogs:

yourladydisdain:

hipstermoriarty:

mockeryd:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

peopleasproducts:

Sexism 60’s

jesus???????????????

What the fuck was wrong with men in the 60’s?

advertising is important as it’s the historian’s best resource for identifying the values of an era. but yeah, these were fucked. the 60s was generally as fucked as the 50s. people forget that. 

It literally says ‘men are better than women’ in bold type, what the fuck. I knew this was a thing, but that is a lack of subtlety I couldn’t have written into a spoof…

This is the generation that spawned most of our parents… People our parents’ age run Washington. Starting to make sense?

When you look to the past, the struggles of the present become a great deal more clear.

Is this a gamergate post?

sizvideos:

Video

micdotcom:

Seattle woman brings groper to justice with one tweet 

Julia Marquand was shopping in downtown Seattle on Oct. 12 when a man began following her closely, then reached out and grabbed her butt.  
Instead of ignoring it, however, Marquand took the issue into her own hands. Thinking quickly, she snapped pictures of her attacker on her phone and reported the incident to the police, she told KING 5 News. 
The cops weren’t interested so she turned to social media | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

Seattle woman brings groper to justice with one tweet 

Julia Marquand was shopping in downtown Seattle on Oct. 12 when a man began following her closely, then reached out and grabbed her butt.  

Instead of ignoring it, however, Marquand took the issue into her own hands. Thinking quickly, she snapped pictures of her attacker on her phone and reported the incident to the police, she told KING 5 News. 

The cops weren’t interested so she turned to social media | Follow micdotcom

robertbrucebanners:

Bruce Banner mentions in the MCU

Today is Racist Fuckery (10.20.14): At yesterday’s protest outside the St Louis Rams game, racist fans got rowdy and physical. Who got arrested? Two of the protesters, of course. Mike Brown means we have to fight back. #staywoke

firesnaps:

BadBoy!Blaine: *doesn’t cut the rings on a six-pack of soda* 

BadBoy!Blaine: *…feels bad about it later and fishes it out of the trash when no one is looking.* 

BadBoy!Blaine: *doesn’t thank the cafeteria workers when getting his lunch* 

BadBoy!Blaine: *goes back later and leaves a heartfelt card and a dozen cookies* 

magpizza:

ingridsbergman:

jillbiden:

avferreira:

Just because a person is a good actor, doesn’t mean they’d be good in any role. 

But Meryl Streep though.

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